Interesting Woodworking Link

Thursday, November 8, 2007

Episode #16 - WOODWORKERS - Lights, Camera, Action!



FYI - this video was shot with the movie feature of a small inexpensive pocket digital camera because my DV video camera was included in the shot. So if you have a pocket digital camera with movie, you can start posting woodworking video content!

Now, if you are like me, when you're not in your shop working its fun to watch woodworking videos and podcasts. See if you can recognize the following m
asters:


OK, if you know the answers than you need to get a life and get out into your shop!

If you don’t know the answers than you are missing out on some great woodworking content on the Internet.

Either way, consider adding some video woodworking content of your own. Perhaps document your newest project, a unique technique or special woodworking skill.

While doing a bit of research for this series, I contacted some of my favorite woodworking podcast producers. Neil Lamens was very generous with his time and offered the following advice during a series of email messages. “If I could make a suggestion, keep the editing software as simple as possible. Time becomes a major issue in getting podcasts posted. Especially when you have another job. Late nights are not unusual.” He also alluded to the need for good lighting stating, “you'll be surprised how well the light bounces off the ceiling and the camera adjusts exposure.”

Neil also had a great idea to protect cameras from shop dust stating "To add to your plastic bag dust protector, if shooting when sanding, cut a hole in the plastic bag, extend just lens through and seal with rubber bands around the camera body."

Matt Vanderlist, from Matt's Basement Workshop responded with a well thought out discussion on making shop videos that I have included as a PDF document. This is a great source of inspiration and advice.

Marc Spagnuolo, from The Wood Whisperer forwarded a link to his website describing his equipment set-up, as well as, a tutorial link he wrote for Lumberjocks detailing uploading video on BlipTV. He also shared that he does his editing on a Mac using Final Cut Express stating that “. . . As far as planning episodes go, I usually just wing it for the most part. I typically have a rough outline of what I want to do, and I go out there and just start running my lips. LOL”.

This blog entry shares how I make low-tech and low-cost woodworking focused video content in my shop. I have written this blog entry for the average "Digital Woodworker". Now, this is not meant to make you a Neil Lamens or a Matt Vanderlist, but rather expose you to a simple primer explaining how to post your own video using simple equipment you may already have available. Granted, videography takes time to set-up and produce. It might even slow you down a bit. The benefit is that this is a lot of fun and a great skill to add to your repertoire. It also gives you a chance to appreciate your work from a new perspective.


What’s my motive? More woodworking videos of course!


My own tips are to use a tripod for a steady shot and try for the best lighting possible. Have fun and start shooting!




DIGITAL VIDEO CAMERA


VIDEO CAMERA POWER SUPPLY


EXTRA DV CAM BATTERY, REMOTE CONTROL, EXTRA DV TAPE


WIRELESS MICROPHONE


CAMERA CABLE, LENS BRUSH, VELCRO CABLE TIES


TRIPOD



SHOP LIGHTS


POWER CORD & MULTI-OUTLET


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