Interesting Woodworking Link

Monday, September 10, 2007

Episode #10 - Fitting / Measuring Gauge

This is a quick and easy shop made measuring gauge that I use for trimming and fitting stock to final dimension. It is made of two thin strips of hardwood (in this case cherry) held in position with a spring binder clamp. I basically lightly loosen the clip and slide the strips tight against the space where a piece of trim is being fitted. I then transfer this dimension to the table saw or chop saw. This is often better than using a measuring tape. Sometimes I will add the thickness of a card or folded piece of paper when the dimension is transfered to the miter saw. This will “spring” the piece for a tight fit or help hone in on the dimension with several fine cuts.

I keep several sizes close by on my bench for various sized openings.

Simple pieces make-up this gauge. Two thin strips of wood and a spring binder clip.

Below, the gauge is being used to measure the dimensions for a thin plywood insert to conceal the pocket screw construction.


Below, you can see one end of the gauge registered against one edge of the dimension being measured.

Below is the final fit of the plywood insert.


video

Finis for now!

Sunday, September 9, 2007

Episode #9 - Veneering Part VII

Vacuum Bag Storage Container

video

Download PDF Instructions to Build Your Own Vacuum Press Bag Storage Container

One of the first things I did after my vacuum press and vacuum bag arrived in the mail was to make a storage container for my bag so it will not get damaged. I used six inch rigid poly drain pipe and end caps to make this container. My goal was to protect the bag, valve and end clamp.

Cutting to length on the chop saw

Drain pipe cut to length and ready for assembly

Getting ready to epoxy the end cap in place

End cap labeled and ready for use - I marked this cap with green tape to make it easy to identify which end to open

Project done - ready to store the bag

Sliding the bag in the storage tube - notice how this will protect the valve and bag

Finis for now . . .

Episode #8 - Veneering Part VI

Loading the Vacuum Press

video

Click here for large format version video on BlipTV

This episode covers glue-up of the “veneer package” leading to the final episode loading the vacuum press.

Well, this is the last of this set of video episodes completing my first run at a veneering project. The panel turned out great and I am looking forward to exploring other wood species. This was a lot of fun.

Finally the vacuum press is loaded!

The vacuum quick connector attached to the vacuum bag

Final 1/4 inch MDF hardboard panel veneered with Movingu

Close-up of panel edge

The final (light colored) panel taped up to a cherry quilt chest frame for comparison

finis . . . for now!

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #7 - Veneering Part V

Veneer Package Glue-Up

video

Click here for large format version video on BlipTV

This episode covers glue-up of the “veneer package” leading to the final episode loading the vacuum press.

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #6 - Veneering Part IV

Veneer Platen Construction

video

Click here for large format version video on BlipTV

This episode continues with making a platen for the veneer vacuum press leading into the next episode about glue-up.

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #5 - Veneering Part III

Veneer Tape-Up • Part II

video

Click here for large format version video on BlipTV

This episode completes the tape-up process for my first veneer panel. More to come – I am trying to keep the clips short for easy uploading.

Just a quick teaser . . . the panel turned out great!

If I can do this anyone can!

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #4 - Veneering Part II

Veneer Tape-Up • Part I

video

Click here for a large format video version on BlipTv


I am very excited to “press on” and start my first veneering project! I plan to veneer a small panel as an experiment to see how the process works. I purchased a couple of veneer packs on sale at Rockler to use in my experiment. This panel is 1/4 inch MDF hardboard veneered with movingui, a hard wood from Africa. I will be using TiteBond Cold Press Veneer Glue.

Some Basic Veneering Definitions

Veneer
– A thin surface layer, as of finely grained wood, glued to a base of inferior material.

Flitch – The thin layers of veneer sliced from a cross–section of a log. Flitch veneers are often kept in order as they are sliced from a log.

MOVINGUI is a bright lemon to orange-colored wood that originated in Africa.

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #3 - Veneering Part I

Vacuum Press and Vacuum Bag Set-Up

video

Click here for a large format video version on BlipTv

This video episode reviews the vacuum press and vacuum bag set-up.

Thanks to Neil Lamens at Furnitology Productions
for the inspiration to start veneering!


Furnitology Blog

Furnitology Productions

Veneer Supplies and Equipment - joewoodworker.com

Episode #2 - Welcome to my Shop!



Welcome to my shop!
I hope this will be a fun look into a small garage based woodworking shop. This blog and video podcast will share some of my shop experiences and projects. I have a keen interest in the melding of traditional and contemporary woodworking techniques and materials.

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My First Shop Tour Video

I can’t help but think, that given modern materials and techniques, that our founding fathers would have just as likely used dimensionally stable sheet goods such as plywood in their frame and panel construction or that they would not hesitate to pull a router out from the bench side tool cabinet to apply a decorative edge or plough a dado. I am sure that they would have smiled given the chance to push a
Lie-Nielsen jointing plane down a fine piece of cherry or strike a fine line with a Blue Spruce marking knife! After all, they were using the best tools, materials and techniques that they had available at the time.