Interesting Woodworking Link

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Episode #83 - A Simple Woodworking Project


This is a simple woodworking project that would be fun and easy for anyone to build. The construction features durable cedar from my scrap bin with simple and strong joinery using Miller Dowels and waterproof Titebond III Glue. My shelf, with five iron towel hooks, was built for outdoor use. The possibilities for variation are endless by altering the shelf length, width of top shelf and back support and details of the corbels. Of course the hooks are optional and there is a wide variety of hooks available.



I am always puttering around our vacation home in Sisters, Oregon. This Thanksgiving was no exception. My wife Beth and I have wanted a place to put a wine glass or two and hang our towels close to our hot tub. I put this project together over two afternoons before we departed for the Thanksgiving holiday. I completed the shelf with some wonderful hand wrought hooks Beth purchased from The Ponderosa Forge in Sisters, Oregon. All that remained was a good oil finish.



No complicated plans exist for this project except some sketches on a sheet of legal-sized printer paper. I sketched the outline of the corbels on the sidebar of the sketch. Then I made a full-sized copy on a full sheet adhesive label. After cutting out the corbel pattern, I cut the rough shape out on the bandsaw. The two corbels were then stuck together with double stick tape and sanded to final shape with an oscillating spindle sander.





After the case, I played around with a rendering on Google SketchUp just for fun and to pass some idle time and exercise my fledgling SketchUp skills. This is a great program for woodworkers. I use the free version available for the Mac.



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9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dave,

Nice project. Here is an idea that would make the project just a little more difficult and learn a new techinque in the process. Use a wedged through tenons to attach both the corbels to the back and top.

Chuck

David Pruett said...

Chuck -

I like the idea of wedged through tenons . . certainly a technique I need to work on!

David

Anonymous said...

Chuck I think that is great idea. Definitely something I have to work on too. Claude

Neil....a Furnitologist said...

Hey David.......we see the shelf and towel rack, where's the wine and hot tub :^)

That's a good project. Some mental gymnastics in planning, 2 days working tools, and a completed functional object. PERFECT!!!

You take some good photographs too. I like the subtle color change on the first photo.

Neil

PS: Hey Chuck!!!

David Pruett said...

Hey Neil . . . thanks for the cool comments! This project made Beth happy. As you know, it is important to keep the shop manger pleased.

David

Anonymous said...

David,

I thought you mentioned that you and your son were going to start the Crazy Leg Table? That is a fun project and a confidence builder. Let's chop, chop

Chuck

David Pruett said...

Chuck -

You have an impeccable memory! My plans got altered somewhat as I sustained a wrist injury that halted any woodworking over the summer. I am just now getting back into the shop.

My son Matt is interested in building the step stool and I have plans on the Fed Table (although I will likely pick one leg stye!).

David

Anonymous said...

Dave,

Crazy Leg's is not about perfection, but learning new techniques. Those techniques include each style of leg, as well as the embellishments. I and most of the builders did not really like the applied spade foot, but now I know how to make it.

I have found that now that it is completed and in the house family friends are interested in the embellishments and the story about why different legs. One suggest is to do the bellflowers and stringing on one of the front legs, not the back as I did.

Chuck

David Pruett said...

Chuck -

Great advice regarding the Crazy Leg . . . I fully understand the teaching value. Definitely skills I want to learn. I was initially thinking about the wife and all those different legs! You do bring up a good selling point is a conversation piece with all the embellishments and history.

I greatly appreciate you following the blog and all of your comments. Fells good to have a couple of Rough Cutters keeping an eye on me!

Thanks!
David